Lanzarote & Fuerteventura | VOLCANOES

I’ve got the hots for volcanoes. And in a next life I will probably be a geologist.
Follow me on a geo-field trip around the Canarian island of Lanzarote.
I also island-hopped to Fuerteventura. Well, to Isla de Lobos more specifically. A little black & white gem, made of so-called hornitos and sand.

Volcanic Olivine-Green Lake | El Golfo

Volcanic Olivine-Green Lake | El Golfo

 

“One of the principal attractions at El Golfo is the famous Green Lagoon – an unusual phenomenon in the cove, where sea water has become trapped in the form of a lake and turned a striking acidic green, due to the algae which lives there.

The beach itself is made of pebbles, and the cliffs behind the lagoon are equally dramatic, having been wind eroded into fantastic shapes over the course of the centuries. The scenery is further enhanced by the large finger of rock which sits just off the beach and causes the sea to crash around it.

This landscape is so wild and raw, filmmakers thought it was the ideal backdrop for Raquel Welch to appear in, wearing her animal skin bikini in the classic movie One Million Years B.C.”  LanzaroteGuidebook

 

Volcanic Olivine-Green Lake | El Golfo

Volcanic Olivine-Green Lake | El Golfo

 

Blowholes in volcanic rock | Los Hervideros

Blowholes in volcanic rock | Los Hervideros

 

“Just along the coast from El Golfo, are the fascinating ‘Boiling Pots’ of Los Hervideros. This is a collection of caves and inlets created by the crashing waves of the Atlantic, where you can look down through blowholes in the volcanic rock at the sea as it surges in and out.

Some of the rock has been shaped into geometric patterns, similar to the weathering at the Giants Causeway in Ireland. César Manrique, the Lanzarote born artist and an architect, added his own touches to Los Hervideros by designing the route of the walkway around the various blowholes and viewing points.” LanzaroteGuidebook

 

Blowholes in volcanic rock | Los Hervideros

Blowholes in volcanic rock | Los Hervideros

 

Lava tube | Cueva de los Verdes

Lava tube | Cueva de los Verdes

 

One of the longest volcanic tunnels in the world, the Cueva de Los Verdes has been protecting locals on Lanzarote for hundreds of years. The Cueva de los Verdes are part of the same collapsed lava tunnel that forms the Jameos del Agua – a 6km long volcanic tube which was created about 5,000 years ago by the eruption of the nearby volcano Monte Corona.” LanzaroteGuidebook

 

Collapsed ava tube | Cueva de los Verdes

Collapsed ava tube | Cueva de los Verdes

 

Collapsed ava tube | Cueva de los Verdes

Collapsed ava tube | Cueva de los Verdes

 

“Los Jameos del Agua, like the Cueva de los Verdes, are located inside the volcanic tunnel created by the eruption of La Corona Vulcano. It owes its name to the existence of an internal lake which constitutes a unique geological formation. It originates by filtration through the rock which lies below sea-level. Within the cave we discover a natural lake of extraordinarily clear waters that houses over a dozen endemic species of great scientific interest, including the famous blind albino crabs that dot the rocky floor of the lake.”  TurismoLanzarote

 

Natural lake inside lava tunnel | Jameos del Agua

Natural lake inside lava tunnel | Jameos del Agua

 

“The Termesana Route in the Timanfaya National Park allows you to come into close contact with the volcano and the culture that permeated the inhabitants of Lanzarote during the 1730-1736 eruptive period. The route, about 3km long, illustrates of how man adapted his lifestyle after a catastrophe of such magnitude. Traditional crops blend in with a landscape dominated by the beauty of its volcanoes, the lava flow and man’s effort to survive after the eruptions.”  The Spanish National Parks authority offers a free guided walk service (in Spanish or English) along two routes in the park. Book at least 48 hours in advance. Timanfaya National Park

 

Collapsed lava tube | Timanfaya National Park

Collapsed lava tube | Timanfaya National Park

 

Pahoehoe or rope lava | Timanfaya National Park

Pahoehoe or rope lava | Timanfaya National Park

 

Pahoehoe or rope lava | Timanfaya National Park

Pahoehoe or rope lava | Timanfaya National Park

 

Tree trunk imprint in lava | Timanfaya National Park

Tree trunk imprint in lava | Timanfaya National Park

 

Lava of 3 different ages | Timanfaya National Park

Lava of 3 different ages | Timanfaya National Park

 

Cinder cone | Timanfaya National Park

Cinder cone | Timanfaya National Park

 

Lava lake crust | Timanfaya National Park

Lava lake crust | Timanfaya National Park

 

The Montañas del Fuego (Fire Mountains) were created between 1730 and 1736 when more than 100 volcanoes, covering more than 50 km², rose up and devastated this part of the island (including several villages). The last eruptions were in 1824, however due to the low rainfall (and therefore lack of erosion) this area appears much the same as it did just after the eruptions. In 1968 the area was declared a national park, Parque Nacional de Timanfaya. While it is not possible to just wander freely around the Volcanoes, a Coach Trip around the National Park (La Ruta de los Volcanos) is included in the entry fee.” DiscoverLanzarote

 

Hornito | Timanfaya National Park

Hornito | Timanfaya National Park

 

Exposed lava tube | Timanfaya National Park

Exposed lava tube | Timanfaya National Park

 

Exposed lava tube | Timanfaya National Park

Exposed lava tube | Timanfaya National Park

 

“After you arrive at the Timanfaya visitors Car Park you will witness several demonstrations of ‘how hot’ the area is (temperatures just a few metres below the surface reach between 400°C and 600°C). Dry brush thrown into a hole in the ground catches fire immediately, while water poured into a bore hole erupts seconds later in the form of steam – like a mini-geyser.” DiscoverLanzarote

 

Underground temperature fluctuates between 100°C and 600°C | Timanfaya National Park

Underground temperature fluctuates between 100°C and 600°C | Timanfaya National Park

 

Geyser | Timanfaya National Park

Geyser | Timanfaya National Park

 

Isla de Lobos (Fuerteventura) is a volcanic island that formed 135.000 years ago. It has a gently undulating landscape covered with raised lumps of basalt and Hornitos, mounds that were created by gas bubbles in lava flows. Volcano Malpais covers much of the surface of the National Park. VisitFuerteventura

 

Over 150 'hornitos' (little ovens) | Isla de Lobos | Fuerteventura

Over 150 ‘hornitos’ (little ovens) | Isla de Lobos | Fuerteventura

 

Over 150 'hornitos' (little ovens) | Isla de Lobos | Fuerteventura

Over 150 ‘hornitos’ (little ovens) | Isla de Lobos | Fuerteventura

 

The Caldera Blanca boiler is the biggest one in Lanzarote with 1200 meters in diameter. What makes this ancient volcano boiler unique is that its color is white.” OutdoorLanzarote

 

Extinct volcano crater | Caldera blanca

Extinct volcano crater | Caldera blanca

 

Montaña Calderata. Caldera Blanca's little neighbour

Montaña Calderata. Caldera Blanca’s little neighbour

 

Black lava next on Caldera Blanca's slopes

Black lava on Caldera Blanca’s white slopes